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CRM Implementation Best Practices Best Practices in CRM Implementation

 

CRM Training

For any CRM implementation to be successful, user buy-in is essential. As mentioned previously, the best way to achieve this is to include users in the entire CRM project from selection to implementation and ongoing refinement. Failure to do so will lead to poor adoption and outright circumvention.

However, initially train employees only on the tasks and features that are pertinent to their role. If you try to train everyone on the entire CRM system you will likely overwhelm the users and delay the deployment process. Do cross-train where it is prudent to do so as this will further insulate the company from problems in staffing changes or shortages. Remember to let business objectives drive your CRM implementation and usage, including your training curriculum.

As was also mentioned previously, user complaints about CRM software are just as likely to be resolved through training as they are through tweaking the CRM system. Sometimes it is hard to tell at first glance which can best resolve the issue.

It is essential then that users be made familiar with the CRM software interfaces, functionalities and features throughout the implementation process so that you obtain valuable input for needed configuration and customizations. If users are more aware of what the application can do, they will typically offer more input in order to get as much as possible out of the system. On the other hand, if they become frustrated trying to get the application to do the simplest of tasks, they’ll typically stop trying and may even resist further training. It is vital then to explain features sets and capabilities long before they are finalized. This ongoing exposure and training will result in fewer criticisms based on ignorance of the system. Allowing ample opportunity for user feedback also greatly eases the user adoption process.

To assist in differentiating between training troubles and software problems, here are a few basic guidelines:

It is most likely a training issue if:

  • the user complains he can not find any useful information
  • the user complains about change
  • the user refers to CRM software as useless
  • the user repeatedly states the old system isn’t broken and doesn’t need fixing
  • the user misuses the CRM system
  • the user’s overall proficiency with other technologies is low
  • the user tends to need frequent and/or superfluous IT support
  • the user continues to keep data somewhere else such as on paper, computer files, CDs, thumb drives, a cell phone address book, or even on a rolodex.

It is most likely a CRM software/interface issue if:

  • the user complains the data she needs is too many steps away from the sign-on
  • the user complains the data is dirty or unreliable
  • the user complains of data entry replication – data should only have to be entered once by the user and then it should flow automatically to related fields
  • the user is proficient in other technologies but is unhappy with the CRM software
  • the user complains of repeated system errors
  • the user complains of slow transaction times
  • the user complains of quality issues
  • the user complains of discrepancies between the data and the reporting.

There is one other frequent problem found behind CRM complaints: fear. Most often fear is a component in sales teams who think CRM software is a means to micro-manage them, punish them for poor performance or to replace their jobs with automation. Staff members in other departments may fear job replacement as well. Typically, these fears are not spoken and employees will go to considerable lengths to quietly sabotage CRM deployments. Look for the signs of fear within your employees early in the CRM implementation process. Address these fears directly and immediately if you find them to be present.

It is most likely a fear response if:

  • the user resists migrating data to the CRM software
  • the user is chronically late in entering data in the CRM system
  • the user is keeping a personal copy of all data he enters into the CRM system
  • the user often enters incorrect or repetitive data in the CRM system
  • the root cause of individual performance slips are not readily found in the CRM analytics

More CRM Software Implementation Best Practices >>

CRM Software ImplementationCRM ImplementationCRM Implementation StepsCRM Implementation TrainingCRM System Implementation

 

 

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Initially train employees only on the tasks and features that are pertinent to their role. If you try to train everyone on the entire CRM system you will likely overwhelm the users and delay the deployment process.

 

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